15 March 2001

Alert

IPI strongly condemns publisher's murder


Incident details

Vitaliy Khaytov

publisher(s)

killed

(IPI/IFEX) - In a 14 March 2001 letter to President Lennart Meri, IPI strongly condemned the murder of a newspaper publisher in Estonia.


According to IPI sources, Vitaliy Khaytov, 57, chief executive of the leading Russian-language daily "Estoniya" and the weekly "Vesti Nedelya Plus", was shot dead in Tallinn just after 3:30 p.m. (local time) on 10 March. He was killed with two shots to his head while sitting in his car in a suburb of the capital. The motive for the murder was unknown, police said.


Khaytov, a Russian citizen, worked as director-general of the Vesti publishing house since 1995 and was responsible for publishing "Estoniya" and "Vesti Nedelya Plus". His 32-year-old son, Marian Khaytov, was shot dead in a similar attack in Tallinn last spring, with police citing controversial business interests as a possible cause of his murder. No one has been charged in that killing.

Recommended Action


Send appeals to the president:

- urging him to ensure that there is a prompt and thorough investigation into Khaytov's murder and that those responsible for this crime are swiftly brought to justice

- further urging him to disclose any findings on this case



Appeals To


APPEALS TO:


His Excellency Lennart Meri

President

Office of the President

Weizenbergi 39

15050 Tallinn

Republic of Estonia

Fax: +3726 31 62 50


Please copy appeals to the source if possible.







Source

International Press Institute
Spiegelgasse 2
1010 Vienna
Austria
ipi (@) freemedia.at
Fax:+43 1 5129014
Estonia
 
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