15 January 2008

HRINFO LAUNCHES DEFAMATION BOOK FOR THE ARAB WORLD


It's no secret that the Egyptian authorities and other governments in the Middle East and North Africa like to use defamation laws to silence writers and journalists. So the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (HRInfo) has fought back with a new book that explains your rights, "Libel and Defamation, and the Freedom of Opinion and Expression".

Find out how libel and defamation are defined in Egypt and what defences you can use if you are sued for such crimes - including a whole section on Supreme Court precedents that put freedom of expression and freedom of political criticism at the forefront. Check out the section on how your computer and mobile phone can be used as evidence against you, and examples of recent cases where journalists were sent down for their work.

The book is the first issue of legal publications and studies that will be published by HRInfo on the law and freedom of expression. For a copy, email: info(@)hrinfo(.)net or see: http://www.hrinfo.net/en/reports/2007/pr1223.shtml
(15 January 2008)



 
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