3 July 1996

Alert

Sud Communication fined one million dollars and five media workers sentenced to jail for public defamation




**Updates IFEX alert dated 11 June 1996**




On 27 June 1996, Sud Communication, the privately-owned
Senegalese media company, was fined 500 million CFA (US$ 1
million) for public defamation of The Mimran Group, a
sugar-importing company. A Magistrates' Court judge ordered Sud
Communication to pay the fine to Jean Claude Mimran, president of
The Mimran Group. In addition, the following were each sentenced
to one month in prison: Abdoulaye Ndiaga Sylla, first
vice-president of Sud Communication and director of "Sud
Quotidien"; Sidy Gaye, editor-in-chief of "Sud Quotidien"; and
reporters Bocar Niang, Mame Oll Faye and Ibrahim Sarr. Babacar
Toure, chairperson and president of Sud Communication, was
acquitted.

Recommended Action


Send appeals to authorities:

  • expressing concern that the sentences are excessive and
    unjustified for a civil suit
  • calling for the reversal of the decisions to fine Sud
    Communication and sentence the five media workers to one month in
    prison





    Appeals To



    His Excellency Abdou Diouf
    President of Senegal
    Dakar, Senegal




    c/o the Senegalese diplomatic representative in your country




    (in Canada)
    Embassy of the Republic of Senegal
    57 Marlborough Avenue
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1N 8E8
    Tel: +1 613 238 6392
    Fax: +1 613 238 2695






    Please copy appeals to the originator if possible.






  • Source

    Committee to Protect Journalists
    330 7th Ave., 11th Floor
    New York, NY 10001
    USA
    info (@) cpj.org
    Fax:+1 212 465 9568
    Senegal
     
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