27 January 1998

Alert

Three journalists briefly detained in Zanzibar; journalist goes into hiding


Incident details

Mwinyi Sadala, Khalfan Said, Pascal Mayalla

journalist(s)

detained

(MISA/IFEX) - Three journalists were briefly detained by the Zanzibar police
on 4 January 1998
while on assignment to cover demonstrations, reports MISA-Tanzania.
Journalists Mwinyi Sadala of "Nipashe" and photo-journalist Khalfan Said of
the "Guardian" newspapers were detained at Madema Police Station for three
hours for attempting to interview detained opposition leaders. Sadala and
Said were accused of obstructing the police in carrying out their work.
Police also confiscated Sadala's camera, which they said would only be
returned to him once the police had developed the film and taken out the
shots they did not like. A photo-journalist from Dar es Salaam Television
(DTV), Pascal Mayalla, was also picked up and questioned by police for
filming the build-up to recent demonstrations in Zanzibar. All three
journalists were later released without charge.


Also on 4 January 1998, police visited the house of British Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) correspondent Ally Saleh with the aim of arresting him.
Saleh went into hiding upon being tipped of the police hunt by his family.
Saleh told MISA-Tanzania that he suspected Zanzibar
authorities were angered by the way he reported various events leading to
demonstrations in support of opposition leaders detained on treason charges.
He was directly told by one police officer that he was inciting the public.
Saleh also believes the move to have been intimidatory and aimed at keeping
him from covering future demonstrations on the matter. He is still in
hiding.




Source

Media Institute of Southern Africa
21 Johann Albrecht Street
Private Bag 13386
Windhoek
Namibia
misaalerts (@) gmail.com
Fax:+264 61 248016
Tanzania
 
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